Tag: OneDrive for Business

Did you know …OneDrive can search for text within images?


It can! Store pictures of business cards and you can search for names. Take pictures of installations and find a set of photos by the business signage. Search through your expense reporting receipts for a specific restaurant. You don’t even to do anything except save an image file on OneDrive for Business to enable this feature.

To find an image containing specific text, open OneDrive from WinAnywhereand use the search dialogue.

In this example, I’m looking for the receipt from a meal –but I haven’t included the restaurant name on the receipt images. But I can search for the restaurant name – type part of the name and hit enter.

The search result set include an image file:

And that’s exactly the receipt I needed!

Text indexing is performed on image files like bmp, png,jpg/jpeg, gif, tiff, and even raw. Slightly blurry out-of-focus pictures snapped in poor lighting are indexed too 😊

* Text is not immediately indexed upon upload – it took about twelve minutes before I was able to search for the image I had uploaded.

Did you know … OneDrive for Business Retains Document History?

Have you ever really messed up a document? Like “man, I wish I could go back to what I had last week, because this is just W.R.O.N.G” messed up? Even if that’s just me, files can become unusable without perfectly human err’ing – ransomware encrypts the file, a colleague removes that paragraph you spent hours getting just right. Did you know that you can restore earlier versions of files stored to OneDrive for Business?

How? From the https://portal.office.com site, select OneDrive

Click the three dots that aren’t quite a hamburger menu – the ones between the file name and the modified date.

On the menu which appears, select “Version History”

A complete version history of the file will be displayed

You can select “Restore” to replace the “current” file with the selected version, or you can select “Open File” to view the file without replacing the “current” file. Voila!